Monday, August 1st, 2022
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Sun SafetyEspañol (Spanish)txt iconAudio DescriptionSkin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S. Too much sun can cause skin cancer. This video explains how to protect your skin from the s...
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How Do I Protect Myself from Ultraviolet (UV) Rays?Source: American Cancer Society @ www.cancer.orgMost skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Most of this exposure com...
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THE WHITE HOUSEBRIEFING ROOMA Proclamation on Emergency Medical Services Week, 2022MAY 13, 2022•PRESIDENTIAL ACTIONSEvery day, emergency medical service (EMS) providers put the needs of their com...
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WANAMASSA FIRST AID SQUAD

Squad 37-22

1401 Wickapecko Drive
Ocean, New Jersey 07712
Monmouth County

A licensed EMS provider staffed by full-time EMTs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


 

The Truth About Sunscreen: 7 Facts That Will Set You Straight for Skin Protection This Summer

Posted on  by DCPC

Anne K. Julian, Ph.D
Behavioral Scientist, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

Reviewed April 28th, 2022

With summer around the corner, smart sun-lovers are planning how to keep their skin safe from sunburn and skin cancer while enjoying the warmer weather. Here are some important facts about sunscreen that will have you loving your skin and the summer at the same time!

 

Studies have shown that consumers use much less sunscreen than is needed to effectively protect, so use more than you think you need.

1Sunscreen is protective. Sunscreen does protect your skin from the sun’s rays, when used as directed. However, some research suggests that sunscreen users get burned frequently, which may be because they use too little, apply it/reapply it too late, or use it to engage in otherwise unsafe sun exposure, like staying out longer or not wearing protective clothing.

2You have to use a lot. That means a shot glass full to cover the full body, a fourth to a half teaspoon for the face. Studies have shown that consumers use much less sunscreen than is needed to effectively protect, so use more than you think you need, or get a measuring spoon!

3Don’t use it solo; it’s important to use a combination of sun safety approaches for effective sun protection. Sunscreen isn’t an all-protective force field. It is intended to be combined with other sun-safety approaches, like covering up with clothing, staying in the shade, wearing a hat, and scheduling activities to avoid times of day when the sun is most intense (10AM – 4PM).

Sunscreen isn’t just a product for women; using sunscreen and other sun-safety strategies is critical for anyone looking to prevent premature aging.

4It doesn’t have to be greasy. Recent advances in sunscreen technology have led to a variety of improved textures and consistencies of sunscreens, from sticks for those who like to roll it on, to light milks that spread easily and leave no white cast. The days of thick pastes are over, but you still need to apply a lot, so pick a product with a texture you really like!

5It isn’t just a girl thing. Few men look forward to having wrinkles, age spots, or discolored skin. Sunscreen isn’t just a product for women; using sunscreen and other sun-safety strategies is critical for anyone looking to prevent the premature aging that comes with sun exposure—not to mention helping prevent skin cancer.

6Coconut oil is not a good sunscreen. Although some sunscreens contain coconut oil, the oil itself is not adequate to prevent skin damage. Coconut oil may extend the time to burn for some individuals, but the level of UV protection is very low and may be highly variable by source, so don’t rely on coconut oil to protect your skin!

7Sunscreen is NOT a “Do-It-Yourself” kind of product. Sunscreen is a non-prescription drug intended to protect the skin. You wouldn’t strap your child in using a seatbelt you made at home, so why protect their skin with untested homemade sunscreen? If you’re concerned about the safety of ingredients in sunscreen, there are other options. You can move your outdoor activities to morning or evening, when the sun is less intense, and cover up, wear a hat, stay in the shade, and use a store-bought, mineral-based sunscreen.

Learn more about sun safety.

Show us your #SunSafeSelfie and join the conversation to raise awareness about the benefits of sun protection!

 

Photograph yourself using sun protection.

Post it on social media and tag it with #SunSafeSelfie.

Practice what you post! (Plan ahead before outdoor activities, so you’re always prepared to stay sun-safe.)

 

Posted on  by DCPC

Categories Skin Cancer


Photograph yourself using sun protection.

Post it on social media and tag it with #SunSafeSelfie.

Practice what you post! (Plan ahead before outdoor activities, so you’re always prepared to stay sun-safe.)

 

Posted on Wednesday, May 1, 2019 by DCPC
Categories Skin Cancer


After nearly two years with Wanamassa First Aid, all of us wish Evatar Kanik (3rd from the left) the very best as he moves on to his next endeavor. Evyatar will begin medical school to achieve his goal of becoming a doctor.


NOTE: All information posted on this Website is the sole property of the Wanamassa First Aid Squad. It shall not be copied, reproduced, disseminated  or used in any manner without the express written permission of the Wanamassa First Aid Squad, Ocean, NJ


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